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The Rev. Dr. John Gill says: “Jesus is All We Need!”



“Jesus is All We Need!”

Please enjoy The Gospel as found in the writings of Rev. Dr. John Gill. He is a noted English Baptist Pastor-Theologian of a bygone era. This is a service of the https://www.invertedchristian.com/ and ministry of The Duke Consulting Group


[Christ] Who of God is made unto us wisdom [1]

I Corinthians 1:30b

Though they are foolish creatures in their own and the world's esteem, yet Christ is their wisdom; he is so “efficiently”, the author and cause of all that spiritual wisdom and understanding in divine things they are possessed of; he is so “objectively”, their highest wisdom lying in the knowledge of his person, blood, and righteousness, of interest in him, and salvation by him; with which knowledge eternal life is connected: and he is so “representatively”; he is their head, in whom all their wisdom lies; he acts for them as their wisdom to God, he is their Counsellor, their Advocate, who pleads and intercedes for them, and [becomes] as their wisdom to men. . . .


And righteousness


He is the “author” of righteousness; he has wrought out and brought in one for them, which is well pleasing to God, satisfying to his justice, by which his law is magnified and made honourable; which justifies from all sin, and discharges from all condemnation, is everlasting, and will answer for them in a time to come; this he has brought in by the holiness of his nature, the obedience of his life, and by his sufferings and death: and which is “subjectively” in him, not in themselves; nor does it lie in any thing [sic] wrought in them, or done by them; but in him as their head and representative, who by “imputation” is made righteousness to them; and they the same way are made the righteousness of God in him; or in other words, this righteousness, by an act of the Father's grace, is imputed, reckoned, and accounted to them as their justifying righteousness. . . .


And sanctification


. . . Christ is the sanctification of his people “by imputation”, as the holiness of his human nature is, together with his obedience and sufferings, imputed to them for their justification; Christ assumed an holy human nature, the holiness of it was not merely a qualification for his office as a Saviour, or what made his actions and sufferings in that nature significant and useful, or is exemplary to men; but is a branch of the saints justification before God: the law required an holy nature, theirs is not holy; Christ has assumed one not for, himself, but for them, and so is the end of the law in all respects: and this may be greatly designed in the whole of this passage; “wisdom” may stand in general for the wise scheme of justification, [because] it is laid in Christ. . . .


And redemption


Which he is by the appointment of his Father, being foreordained to it before the foundation of the world; and this sense of the word made will agree with every clause in the text; and he is so efficiently, having obtained eternal redemption from sin, Satan, the law, and this present evil world, for his people; and “subjectively” it being in him, and every other blessing which is either a part of it, and comes through it, or is dependent on it, as justification, adoption, and remission of sins. Moreover, this may have respect not only to redemption past, which is obtained by Christ; but to that which draws near, the saints are waiting for, and to which they are sealed up by the Spirit of God; even their redemption and deliverance from very being of sin, from all sorrow and sufferings, from death and the grave, and everything that is afflicting and distressing.


[1]John Gill, “I Corinthians 1:30,” John Gill’s Exposition of the Old & New Testament, Vol. 8 (London: Mathews & Leigh, 1809; reprint, Paris, AR.: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1989), 605-606 (page citations are to the reprint edition).

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